Education

Jewellery Education

METALS

Yellow Gold

Natural gold and colour-saturated alloys are what give yellow gold jewellery its rich shine. The alloys most commonly used are copper and silver.

Gold Purity

Pure gold is too soft for everyday wear, so it is alloyed with a mixture of metals like silver, copper, nickel, and zinc to give it strength and durability. The karat weight of gold, denoted by a number followed by "k" indicates purity, or how much of the metal in a piece of jewellery is gold. 24k gold is pure gold while 18k gold is 75% pure gold and 14k is 58% pure gold.

White Gold

In order to make the gold white, it is combined with metal alloys that are white in nature and plated with an extremely hard element called rhodium. Although strong, rhodium may wear away over time but can be easily replated.

Rose Gold

The beautiful color of rose gold is created by using a copper alloy. The overall percentages of metal alloys is the same for rose gold as it is for yellow or white but a different mixture of alloys is used to obtain the rose gold color.

Platinum

The most popular metal for engagement rings and wedding bands, platinum's naturally white sheen will never fade or change colour and accentuates the sparkle and brilliance of a diamond.

Palladium

Palladium is a member of the Platinum Group Metals. In recent years it has become more and more popular as a metal for engagement rings.

Alternative Metals:

Tungsten Carbide

The beautiful color of rose gold is created by using a copper alloy. The overall percentages of metal alloys is the same for rose gold as it is for yellow or white but a different mixture of alloys is used to obtain the rose gold color.

Cobalt

Made from a highly durable alloy, cobalt is four times harder than platinum. Because of its natural hardness, cobalt jewellery is extremely scratch, chip and corrosion-resistant.

Titanium

Stronger than steel and significantly lighter, Titanium is the metal of choice for jets, sports equipment. And today, Titanium is the choice for brilliant jewelry that does not dent, scratch, or lose its lustrous silver shine

Gemstones for Months

January Birthstone:

Garnet

February Birthstone:

Amethyst

March Birthstone:

Aquamarine

April Birthstone:

Diamond

May Birthstone:

Emerald

June Birthstone:

Pearl or Alexandrite

July Birthstone:

Ruby

August Birthstone:

Peridot

September Birthstone:

Sapphire

October Birthstone:

Tourmaline or Opal

November Birthstone:

Topaz or Citrine

December Birthstone:

Tanzanite, Zircon or Turquoise

The 4 Cs of Diamonds

Diamond professionals use four important factors to describe and classify diamonds: Cut, Color, Clairity, and Carat Weight.

For more information visit our store to speak with a qualified associate.

CUT

Of all the 4Cs, Cut has the greatest effect on a diamond's beauty. In determining the quality of the cut, the diamond grader evaluates the cutter's skill in the fashioning of the diamond. The more precise the cut, the more captivating the diamond is to the eye.

Color

Color Gem-quality diamonds occur in many hues. In the range from colorless to light yellow or light brown. Colorless diamonds are the rarest.
Other natural colors (blue, red, pink for example) are known as "fancy", and their color grading is different than from white colorless diamonds.

Clarity

Diamonds can have internal characteristics known as inclusions or external characteristics known as blemishes. Diamonds without inclusions or blemishes are rare; however, most characteristics can only be seen with magnification.

Carat

The carat is the diamond's physical weight measured in metric carats. One carat equals 1/5 gram and is subdivided into 100 points. Carat weight is the most objective grade of the 4Cs.

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